Enrico Isamu Ōyama Solo Exhibition “Windowsill”

- NY’s talented artist, who is crossing between contemporary art and street culture, visits Japan -

An exhibition with a “Cultural exchange between Japan and the world, through art” theme will be held at NEWoMan’s LUMINE 0, a venue created under a ‘Japan Creative Terminal’ concept for cultural exchange events. NY-based Japanese artist Enrico Isamu Ōyama, who has collaborated with names like Comme des Garçons and Shu Uemura in the past, is the featured artist and will be making a Japan visit to unveil his latest works.

Event Details
Dates: Thursday, June 29, 2017 - Tuesday July 4, 2017
Time: 11am to 7pm
Venue: LUMINE0
(Address: NEWoMan 5F, 5-24-55 Sendagaya, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo)
URL: http://www.lumine.ne.jp/luminezero/event/
Admission: Free
Organizer: LUMINE Co., Ltd
Partners: Takuro Someya Contemporary Art, hpgrp GALLERY

Enrico Isamu Ōyama
Artist Enrico Isamu Ōyama was born in Tokyo in 1983 to an Italian father and a Japanese mother. Ōyama gained recognition from his murals and paintings based on “Quick Turn Structure”, an idea adapted from visual language of street culture. His works also include collaborations with Comme des Garçons and Shu Uemura, and “Against Literacy: On Graffiti Culture” (LIXIL Publishing). Ōyama currently resides in New York.
http://www.enricoisamuoyama.net

Enrico Isamu Ōyama - Windowsill
The windowsill describes a space where decorative plants and other objects are often placed. Since Leon Battista Alberti’s propositions during the Italian Renaissance period, painting has long been described as a metaphor for the window. Based in these notions, Ōyama inserts the image of the windowsill into its own context in order to conceptualize a more complex space. In general, the landscape as seen through a window is in actuality the unending flourishing of nature. Through the demarcation of the window frame, it becomes a single picture. The decorative plants lining the windowsill are restricted by the pots that hold them. They exist as sculptural pieces, as individualized elements of nature. When these two strains of nature overlap through the medium of the window, the expansive space becomes a backdrop, while the numerous individual elements stand together to create a multi-layered sensation. These two layers are loosely connected as elements of the same nature, but together they melt into the ebbing push-and-pull dynamic that weaves throughout. Ōyama says that this state will be portrayed through the works in this exhibition. The lively movement of the marks in the background are a direct transcription of the body’s motions, with the resulting space extending beyond the frame. In addition, Ōyama’s signature motif, Quick Turn Structure, creates a visual icon through the formal organization of its connected lines. These two layers of organic and structural marks knit together to form a visual dynamism.

While the works in the exhibition were being created, the canvases were pinned onto the wall, rather than mounted over a stretcher. In some of them, the bottom part of the canvas draped onto the floor, where the artist stood while working, with the traces of his footprints becoming an image, and the drips of the painting materials gathering to create the belt of black. This black shape becomes a metaphor for the windowsill itself. In this way, these spaces stemming from different dimensions are bundled together to create a rich and engaging image.

Image Credit (Top to Bottom)

1.
Enrico Isamu Oyama, FFIGURATI #20, 2012
Acrylic-based aerosol, acrylic-based marker, graphite, pencil and sumi ink on unstretched canvas
(H)3.37m x (W)2.45m
© Enrico Isamu Oyama
Photo © Yojiro Imasaka
Courtesy of Takuro Someya Contemporary Art

2.
Enrico Isamu Ōyama, FFIGURATI #105A , 2015
© Enrico Isamu Ōyama
Makeup © uchiide (shu uemura)
Photo © Yoshiaki Sekine
Model © Ami Suzuki (Satoru Japan)
Courtesy of Takuro Someya Contemporary Art

3.
Enrico Isamu Ōyama, FFIGURATI #40 , right wall, 2013
Hausprojekt M29, Berlin, Germany
© Enrico Isamu Ōyama
Courtesy of Takuro Someya Contemporary Art

4.
Enrico Isamu Ōyama, Photo by WOWE

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